Oh no, not more of the same TDD discussion Tedium.

Every once in a while, otherwise reasonable people get together to argue about TDD with religious zeal. In the most recent flare-up, I’ve been disappointed that on all sides, as nobody is saying anything new.

Yawn

At the risk of adding yet more noise, I did have a two nuanced thoughts that are at least new to me and I thought I would share them, along with a recent personal anecdote.  If this is obvious or old-hat to you, then I’m sorry.  If you think I’m  too stupid for words and that I’m drinking and/or selling snake-oil enriched kool-aid, I look forward to what will undoubtedly be informed and insightful feedback.

1. s/driven/aware/

The hardcore position of “never write a line of production code without a failing test for it” probably does more harm than good. Different kinds of code require varying degrees of effort (cost) to write and maintaintests for. Different kinds of code give varying degrees of benefit from test automation. Without always realizing it, developers make cost-benefit decisions all the time, and good development organizations empower their developers to act on those decisions.

That said, the cost-benefit decisions developers make must at least be informed decisions. A professional developer who hasn’t taken the time to learn how to use the appropriate test frameworks for their language/environment (jUnit, nUnit, whatever) is just plain negligent in 2009.  Test automation is just one tool in a competent developer’s toolbox, but a critical one.  I wouldn’t trust a carpenter who didn’t know what a hammer was, or a cardiologist who hadn’t bothered to learn about this newfangled angioplasty business.

Test-driven may not be appropriate for every context, but everyone needs to be at least test-aware.

2. s/first/concurrently/

Test-first is a really helpful approach, but it doesn’t work with the way everyone thinks, and mandating that everyone must always think in exactly the same way is the worst sort of micro-management.  The other extreme, writing test automation for a large system after it’s complete, is often prohibitively difficult and (frankly) boring as hell.

My advice is to always at least think about how you would write tests for your code before writing it. That will help keep you from painting yourself into untestable corners. Also, interlacing test writing immediately after you get a small subset of your system done is going to be much easier than testing the whole thing after the fact.  Personally, I move back and forth between writing the tests first and writing the code first. The key for me is that I’m working in short code-test-code-test cycles, using persistent (that is, I don’t throw it away when I’m done) test code as the primary mechanism for executing the code I’m writing as I’m writing it.  I don’t think of the process as being test-first, I think about testing concurrently with coding.

Recent Anecdote

Sure, anecdotes aren’t data, and they can’t prove anything, so take from it what you will

I just finished a pretty big refactoring project (that is a “pure” refactoring, the external interfaces and behavior of the existing stay the same but the underlying implementation was improved) of a system that had some decent test automation. Every time I got an edge case behavior wrong, introduced a side-effect, or removed a necessary side-effect (yuck), a test would go from green to red. This saved me at least a few days of development and testing time, and reduced the chances that I would release bugs to our QA guy (bad) or our production system (even worse).

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: